Sarah White gives John Lewis Memorial Lecture (Cardiff)

Sarah White gave the annual John Lewis Memorial Lecture at the Centre for Law and Religion in Cardiff, held as part of the LLM in Canon Law. Professor John Lewis, an associate of the Centre and professor at Windsor University Ontario, taught regularly from 1993 until his death in 1999. Dr White’s lecture was about the beginnings of the canon law profession in England and focused on three individuals: Roger de Cantilupe, a lawyer from the 1240s, Richard de Clyve, a judge from the 1290s, and an unnamed lawyer, also from the 1290s. Although we know a considerable amount about legal education at the universities, the details of the men who studied and practiced law are often less well known. Using the case records from the Court of Canterbury, this lecture highlighted elements of these men’s careers – who they were, where they worked, and how they used their legal education.

Atelier Doctoral at the École Française in Rome

On February 18-23, Project director Professor John Hudson, senior researcher Professor Emanuele Conte, project post-doctoral researchers Dr Andrew Cecchinato, Dr Will Eves, Dr Attilio Stella and Dr Sarah White, and doctoral researchers Dan Armstrong and David de Concilio participated in the Atelier Doctoral at the École Française in Rome, on the theme: ‘Dal caso alla regola, dalla teoria ai fatti: alle radici della cultura giuridica europea‘.

The doctoral week provided the opportunity for PhD and early career researchers to present their research and act as discussants to papers delivered by other attendees. Professor John Hudson delivered a keynote lecture on the subject of Learning from casuistic approaches to Common Law. Dan Armstrong gave a paper entitled Politics, Law, and Ecclesiology in Anglo-Papal relations, and David de Concilio presented on the topic of Dialectic in the development of medieval legal thought: a European history.The event was attended by a number of senior scholars from around Europe, who offered advice and support to the junior scholars who were present.

The week was punctuated by a visit to Ostia Antica on Wednesday 20 February, during which the Atelier Doctoral delegates were given a guided tour of the ancient Roman site. On the evening of the 21 February, the delegates were kindly welcomed to Le Palais Farnèse, the French Embassy in Rome, and given a tour of the library of the École Française, which is located in the building.

Atelier Doctoral Programme (Click to expand)

Talking Law: The Jury on Trial

In England on 26 January 1219 a royal order was issued to the king’s travelling justices, to
put into effect the decree of a Papal Council that had the effect of abolishing trial by ordeal.
The need for a new mode of trial in criminal cases ended up with the use of jury trial, for so
long a defining characteristic of English Common Law.

On 11 February 2019, at 7pm in the Arts Lecture Theatre, the Institute of Legal and
Constitutional Research will put the institution of the jury itself on trial, with a debate on the
motion ‘This house believes that jury trial remains a virtue of the Common Law.’

Speakers will include the barrister, broadcaster and writer Harry Potter.

The event is open to the public.

7 pm on 11 February 2019 (Arts Lecture Theatre)

Talking Law: ‘The Jury on Trial’

In England on 26 January 1219 a royal order was issued to the king’s travelling justices, to put into effect the decree of a Papal Council that had the effect of abolishing trial by ordeal. The need for a new mode of trial in criminal cases ended up with the use of jury trial, for so long a defining characteristic of English Common Law.

On 11 February 2019, at 7pm in the Arts Lecture Theatre, the Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research will put the institution of the jury itself on trial, with a debate on the motion ‘This house believes that jury trial remains a virtue of the Common Law.’

Speakers will include the barrister, broadcaster and writer Harry Potter.

The event is open to the public.

7 pm on 11 February 2019 (Arts Lecture Theatre)

Ordo Iudiciorum Workshop (Roma Tre) 1 December 2018

On 1 December there will be a workshop at Roma Tre University, designed to be an informal discussion on the ordo iudiciorum in theory and in practice.

It will be opened by presentations by Sarah White (St Andrews) and William Sullivan (Chicago/Harvard), who are both currently working on medieval ordines. The seminar will be bilingual: Italian and English.

One-Year Postdoctoral Research Position

Applications are invited for a one-year Research Fellowship in legal history available at the University of St Andrews from January 2019. The position is to work with Professor John Hudson on the ERC Advance Grant funded project ‘Civil Law, Common Law, Customary Law: Consonance, Divergence and Transformation in Western Europe from the late eleventh to the thirteenth centuries’ (CLCLCL). In addition to pursuing the specified research within the project, the successful applicant will be required to participate in the broader work of the project by contributing to workshops and outreach activities.

Application details may be found here:

ttps://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BNF609/research-fellow-in-medieval-legal-history-france-ar2153sb

Medieval Norman Law vs Roadworks

The Clameur de Haro, an invocation for aid which formed part of medieval Norman law, is sometimes still used in Jersey and Guernsey to prevent to the commission of a wrongful act against an individual. Its effect is similar to an injunction. The most recent attempt to use the clameur occurred this summer:

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/aug/14/guernsey-resident-halts-road-works-with-ancient-plea?CMP=share_btn_fb

Recent Books

Two books have recently been published by members of the CLCLCL project:

John Hudson‘s The Formation of the English Common Law: Law and Society in England from King Alfred to Magna Carta, (Routledge, 2017) is a much expanded second edition of The Formation of the English Common Law: Law and Society in England from the Norman Conquest to Magna Carta, (Longmans, 1996).

Emanuele Conte has edited, with Laurent Mayali, A Cultural History of Law in the Middle Ages (Bloomsbury, 2018). This is the second volume of Bloomsbury’s six-volume A Cultural History of Law series.